Dolby Atmos tools allow for flexibility in the speaker configuration chosen, and guidance is available for the

conversion of your room into a multichannel mixing environment. You can mix Dolby Atmos in headphones,

on stereo speakers, or on up to a full 64-channel output system, such as those available in film mix

workflows.

Common Dolby Atmos speaker configurations include 6.0.6 (L, R, Lss, Rss, Lsr, Rsr, Ltf, Rtf, Ltm, Rtm, Ltr,

Rtr), 7.1.4 (L, C, R, LFE, Lss, Rss, Lsr, Rsr, Ltf, Rtf, Ltr, Rtr) and 9.1.6 (L, C, R, LFE, Lss, Rss, Lsr, Rsr, Ltf, Rtf, Ltm,

Rtm, Ltr, Rtr). The role of the Renderer is to preserve your artistic intent in the speaker configuration you

have used when creating your mix, as well the end listener's speaker configuration.

The Dolby Atmos Renderer also allows you to audition how your mix may translate to other speaker

configurations. For example, if your colleague in a different country mixed a song in their 7.1.4 configuration

and sent it to you for comments/collaboration, in your 9.1.6 room you could create a subset of your speakers

to experience the mix on the same monitoring configuration that they used.